INTERNATIONAL PARTNERSHIP FOR

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

(34 Years of Helping the World's Poor)

 

722 East Market Street, Suite 100

Leesburg, Virginia 20176.

 

IPHD's CONGO REPUBLIC PROGRAM DESCRIBING USDA FOOD AID PROGRAMS,

OTHER U.S.GOVERNMENT SUPPORT, UNITED NATIONS SUPPORT

AND

SOME PRIVATE DONOR SUPPORT AND ACTIVITIES.

 

 

image

 

Emphasis is placed on the projected full transition of the McGovern-Dole Food for Education Program to Congolese Government Support by 2020 (a total of 200,000 students of which more than half are already transitioned).

 

image

 

INTERNATIONAL PARTNERSHIP FOR

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

(34 Years of Helping the World's Poor)

 

722 East Market Street, Suite 100

Leesburg, Virginia 20176.

 

CONGO REPUBLIC FOOD FOR EDUCATION PROGRAM:

A Program in Transition

 

Food for Education Programs Supported by USDA in Congo Republic

 

 

Yea r

 

Agreement No.

 

Countrv

Number of Beneficiaries

Tonnage

<MT)

Program Value ((JS$)

2001

GFE.679.2001/671.00

Congo

217,696

8,294

7,955,351

2002

GFE.679.2002/1131.00

Congo

217,696

8,980

10,922,620

2004

FFE.679.2004/194.00

Congo

213,480

2,367

3,196,860

2006

FFE.679.2006/113.00

Congo

96,557

6,595

9,598,845

2007

FFE.679.20071113.00

Congo

110,000

6,258

9,520,579

2008

FFE.679.2008/113.00

Congo

65,215

3,970

8,014,151

2011

FFE-679-2011/020-00

Congo

143,000

4,270

7,000,000

2012

FFE-670-2011/020

Comm

110,000

2,690

6,000,000

2013

FFE-679-2011/020

Congo

75,000

1,160

5,200,000

     

1,248,644

44,584

67,408,406

 

Note: The above 113 and 020 agreements were multi-year programs with the 020 being carried out between 2012 and early 2017 because of late food arrivalsThe 2011program did not begin until later in 2012. As schools were transitioned to Congo funding, more schools were added by the Congolese Government to the 2011 program. At the end of the program 75,000 children remained to be transitioned. During the lifespan of the 2011 agreement, IPHD was able to reach 200,000 children with combined USDA and Congo Government foods.

 

Congo Republic Government Funding

 

  • Ministry of Education

Year

Amount US$

2011 (May)

4,632,989.69

2012 (Julv)

3,092,783.51

2012 (November)

3,092,783.51

2013 (July)

4,123,711.34

2014 (June)

2,061,855.67

2014 (December)

4,123,711.34

2015 (October)

2,061,856.00

2016 (May)

3,092,173.00

2017 budgeted)

11,224,489.00

TOTAL

37,506,353.06

  • Ministry of Agriculture

     

    Year

     

    Amount US$

    2011(July)

    618,556.70

    2012 (July)

    6,185,490.36

    2012 (December)

    6,185,567.01

    2013

    0.00

    201(November)

    6,185,567.01

    2015 (February)

    8,041,305.32

    2015 (June)

    1,600,000.00

    2016 (May)

    4,500,000.00

    2017 (budet)

    3,061,224.00

    TOTAL

    36,377'710.40

     

    Note: The 2016 agreement was for the development of a national seed bank

     

    TOTAL CASH CONTRIBUTIONS

    Ministry of Education

    37,506,353.06

    Ministry of Ariculture

    36,377,710.40

    GRAND TOTAL

    73,884,063.46

     

    IN-KIND CONTRIBUTIONS

  • Ministry of Agriculture

    image

    115 tractors other farm equipment 6,18s,561.oo I

     

    image

    The value of the 8 farms and farm

    buildin s anted to IPHD 3,092,783.00

    image

     

    image

    GRAND TOTAL IN-KIND

    CONTRIBUTIONS 9,278,350.00

    image

     

    image

    image

  • Local Community/PTA Contributions (non-government)

     

    Grand Total of In-Kind and Cash Contributions from Local PTAs and Communities

     

    8,000,000.00

    GRAND TOTAL CASH AND IN-KIND CONTRIBUTIONS OF CONGO GOVERNMENT/PEOPLE

     

    100,440,763.46

    Combined USDA and Congo Cash and In-kind Contributions to the Food for Education Proram

     

    167,849,169.46

    Presently, IPHD/Congo produces enough corn for school lunches and a surplus for local markets. Besides distributing food from the farms to schools, IPHD sells some of its produce from the southern farms, sales averaging annually between $400,000 and

    $500,000,which is invested back into farm production. IPHD employs over 300 people in

    its farm program.

     

  • Other Congo Contributions since 2012 for the school lunch program

    image

    image

    ENI (Italian Oil Co.)/UNICEF/etc 1,000,000.00 I

    In addition to the above, IPHD produces corn, manioc, some soybeans, rice and peants, and has been experimenting with potatoes for school lunches. IPHD also has used Congolese Government grants to purchase foods in the United States such as 226 tons of potato flakes, 40 tons of soy flour, valued at $395,000. Beans have also been purchased in the United States as well as China. IPHD expects in the next three years to make additional purchases of potato flakes and other commodities in the U.S. Potato flakes are an important part of the school lunch program.

     

    Production of beans is very small but can be increased, however, this depends on finding quality seed. As in many African countries there is a great need for a seed germination project. Currently, IPHD has to buy seed outside of Congo.

     

    In addition to the above funding, parent/teacher and other community groups provide fuel, over 1,200 cooks, local vegetables, fruits, salt, sugar valued at well over one million dollars annually. All food is prepared at and eaten in the school. There are no take-home foods.

     

    IPHD with USDA and Congolese funds supports a literacy improvement program, nutrition health education programs, development of the PTA structure, and improvement of school infrastructure along with installation of water systems and latrines for schools.

    Many schools have school gardens and local community school committees developed by IPHD.

     

    Total number of students as of 2017: 200,000

  • Total number graduated to Congolese resources and IPHD farm foods: 130,000.

  • Total still being fed with USDA foods: 70,000. Total number to be transitioned by mid-2020: 200,000

NOTE: All of the farms have been given to IPHD via a contract for a 10 year period to 2021, renewable for a further period of timeThe Congo Government is providing funding to IPHD to create the first seed germination project in the country.

 

NOTE: IPHD also trains farmers in modern methods of agriculture and in addition has an annual income from renting out tractors and drivers to farmers.

 


 

CONGO GOVERNMENT FUNDING FROM THE MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

(Only to 2015)

 

Date

Activity

Amount US$

2011- 2015

Food Purchases (does not include ocean freight and local transport to warehouses)

 

11,489,181

 

School Repairs

448,009

 

Malaria/Health Interventions

75,797

 

School Gardens

78,970

 

Pilot Fuel Program for School Kitchens

50,619

 

PTAs

332,214

 

Water Sanitation

158,351

 

School Storerooms

103,345

 

Warehousing/Internal Food Transport Management costs

 

8,853,205

 

Total

21,589,691

 

Balance Held

1,600,000

 

GRAND TOTAL

$23,189,691

 

Note: The above expense report does not include funds received for 2016, nor funds from the Ministry of Agriculture.

 

 

Some of the food for education research projects cond ucted by IPHD/Congo

 

  1. Malaria Study (2006/2011). The study concentrated on five (5) departments covered by the IPHD Malaria Prevention Program, a component of the FFE Program. A random sample was taken of 20 primary schools in each department10 were schools participating in the IPHD School Lunch Program and 10 were non­ participating schools. A random sample was then taken of 1,000 from selected school lunch schools and 1,000 from non-participating schools. The children were followed by IPHD monitors and staff to ascertain the impact of the Malaria Prevention Program on absenteeismTeachers collected data on a daily basis and IPHD monitors visiting the schools collected the data weekly and also met with the teachers and students in the program.

     

    The Results of the Study are as follows

     

     

    Random Samples of 1,000 Students in 10 Schools with Prepared Meals Mosquito Nets.

    (100 students per school)

    Random Sample of 1,000 Students in Schools without a School Meal and without Mosquito Nets

    (100 students per schools) Absences (%)

    Year

    Absences (%)

    2006

    5.03

    14.9

    2007

    3.97

    13.3

    2008

    3.88

    15.1

    2011

    2.99

    14.1

     

    The highest absentee rates were in Lekoumou Departmet.

     

    Also, in 2006, IPHD began de-worming on a quarterly basis as it found that unless children are de-wormed frequently the vila in the intestinal tract remains stunted and any increased protein and minerals from USDA foods are difficult to absorbThis was also seen in a 1974 study undertaken in a CRS Dominican Republic Program when Bill Pruzensky was there and to overcome it, dairy products were used for a period of time before absorption increased.

     

  2. Study on Enrolment (2003-04)IPHD and the Ministry of Education created and trained a joint evaluation team to study primary school trends in enrolment, using 2000 as the base year. 42 schools were randomly selected in 5 departments (regions); each with a school lunch program. The study found that average enrolment increased by 10 percent. The most dramatic change was in the enrolment of pygmy children inthe Lekoumou Department, where enrolment increased from 35 pygmy children to 737 pygmy children, or 2,105 percent. For all the schools, female enrolment increased in all 42 schools by 7 percent.


    Study on the Acceptability of Energy/Nutrition Bars in Primary schools (2005/6).

  3. Challenge Dairy/California provided 3,600 55 gram high protein bars resembling granola bars. These came in the following flavors:

    • Chocolate/Peanut Butter,

    • Apple/Cinnamon,

    • Strawberry/Yogurt,

    • Mixed Berry.

       

      The objective of the study was to ascertain which bar flavor might be most acceptable to primary school-age children, with the intention of marketing or distributing the acceptable bar to local markets and government programs in Africa. Two primary schools in the school lunch program in the Pointe Noire area were randomly selectedThey totaled 543 children. IPHD staff developed and employed the necessary research instruments. Surprisingly, the children preferred the strawberry/yogurt flavor. IPHD/Congo felt the study was too small to make any reliable result. A large number of bars and additional primary schools would be needed.

       

  4. African Education Initiative Study 2005-09 (USAJDIUSDA): The study had two main components: (1) a "scholarship component consisting of children's textbooks and teachers' guides, school supplies, kitchen utensils, and school uniforms and sandals; and (2) school gardens. Consultants from USDA trained researchers and staff and made periodic visits to the Congo. A total of 9,607 students in 31schools participated in the scholarship component. The total included 1,063 new students. The largest increase instudents again was among pygmy children in the Lekoumou area. Uniforms and sandals were what mainly contributed to the increase. As of 2015,IPHD now feeds almost 1,500 pygmies in the Lekoumou area.

     

    The school garden initiative targeted 21 schools in Lekoumou. Up to 9,000 Bantu and pygmy children attended these schools. USDA consultants were Jennifer Maurer and Drs. Doyle and Mary Crave. The team, with IPHD staff trained 80 teachers and 20 pygmy representatives. A Pocket Guide for School Gardens was developed and is still used by IPHD/Congo to expand and improve school gardens. Over 200 schools now have some form of school gardens and use vegetables from

    these gardens in school meals. The project also increased parent and community involvement in the schools. The consultants also found that student retention and attendance increased by over 50 percentThe Congolese Government gave funds for extending school gardens in early 2015.

     

  5. 2006 Health Study in Pointe Noire by a Medical Missionaries Health Team covered by IPHD. The team was composed of 3 doctors, 3 nursesan ophthalmologist and a pharmacist from the United States. They studies 1,000 patients at one of the Pointe Noire clinics and found that 65 percent of the patients had vision problems, 12 percent suffered from malaria, and others suffered from high blood pressure, rheumatism, respiratory illness and 8 percent HIV/AIDS.

     

  6. Other Research Studies: In addition to the above studies, IPHD/Congo staff has been involved in commodity acceptability studies for the Alaska Salmon Board and the U.S.Potato Board. Research was also done on growing various kinds of potatoes from potato seed on IPHD farms. Inaddition, there were a couple of studies done during the time that IPHD had Food for Progress Programs in the Congo.

 

 

USDA/FAS AND USAID SUPPORT FOR CONGO SCHOOL SCHOLARSIDP AND GARDENS PROGRAM

 

Year

Agreement #

Value

Purpose

Beneficiaries

2006

57-3148-6-143

303,772

Provide scholarships of school materials, uniforms, and training and developing school gardens.

 

8,544

2008

58-3148-6-143

338,800

Provide scholarships of school materials, uniforms, and training and developing school gardens.

 

7,700

TOTAL

642,572

 

16,244

 

 

image image

 

INTERNATIONAL PARTNERSHIP FOR

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT

(34 Years of Helping the World's Poor)

 

722 East Market Street, Suite 100

LeesburgVirginia 20176.

 

USDA FOOD FOR PROGRESS AGREEMENTS IMPLEMENTED BY IPHD IN THE CONGO REPUBLIC.

 

Agreement #

Metric Tons

Program Value

Number of Beneficiaries

FCC-679-2002/1036-00

3,487

4,869,114

80,800

FCC-679-2003/091-00

4,498

6,002,285

40,000

FCC-679-2004/028-00

3,997

5,615,442

92,000

FCC-679-2006/039-00

5,799

10,613,339

197,382

TOTAL

17,781

27,100,180

410,182

 

Food for Progress Agreements were both monetization and distribution programs. Monetization funds were used to upgrade the cacao plantations on the coast, also IPHD was able to support the development of Congo Republic's only chocolate-making factory. Other activities supported were: food banks for farmers to improve marketing, rural food­ for-work projects, a poultry program, an HIV/AIDS Program partly supported by Chevron, farmer and women's loan funds, a river fishing program, vocational training centers for boys and girls and other similar activities. One of the most important activities was to revitalize the cassava farms which were destroyed by bight. As a result, cassava production has increased greatly and has become one of the products used in a number of school lunches, along with USDA and locally purchased foods.

 

SECTION 416(b) AGREEMENTS IMPLEMENTED BY IPHD IN THE CONGO REPUBLIC

 

 

 

Year

 

Af,?reement Number

 

Country

Number of Beneficiaries

Tonnage (MT)

Program Value (US$)

2000

OGSM-G-679- 2000/579-00

Congo Republic

16,037

5,000

5,242,406

2001

OGSM-G-679- 20011735-00

Congo Republic

21,700

9,931

4,453,651

 

TOTAL

 

37,737

14,931

9,696,057

 

 

image

 

 

NON-GOVERNMENT LOCAL CONTRIBUTIONS

 

(Labor, Local In-kind Food and Funds, Equipment/f ools, TransportConstruction Materialsetc.)

 

Section 416(b) Proerams

Country

Number of Projects

Value US$

Congo Republic

2

1,905,000

TOTAL

2

1,905,000

 

F00d fior Progress

Country

Number of Projects

Value US$

Congo Republ c

4

3,225,000

TOTAL

4

3,225,000

 

Country

Number of Projects

Value US$

Congo Republic

5

8,000,000

TOTAL

5

8,000,000

 

Food for Education

 

Note: Some of these are multi-year agreements

 

 

OTHER U.S.GOVERNMENT FUNDING FOR IPHD's CONGO REPUBLIC PROGRAM

 

USAID International Food Relief Partnership Program

 

Agreement #

Country

Tonnal!e

Value

Beneficiaries

FFP-G-00 -06-00033-00

Cone:o Republic

75

290,000

23,061

TOTAL

 

75

290,000

23,061

 

USAID/OFDA NON-FOOD AID FUNDING SUPPORT (2006-2015

 

 

Year

 

Agreement #

 

Country

 

Agency

Funding (US$)

 

Purpose

 

Beneficiaries

2006

Via U.S.

Embassy

Congo Republic

USAID/OFDA

50,000

Flood victims

35,000

2011

AID-OAA-G- 11-00030

Congo Republic

USAID/OFR

6,436

Ocean Freight Reimbursement

5,000

 

2016

 

AID-OAA-G- 16-00001

Congo

Republic

 

USAID/OFR

 

9,000

 

Ocean Freight Reimbursement

 

21,000

 

TOTAL

   

65,436

 

51,000

 

U.S. STATE DEPARTMENT FUNDING

 

image

Year

I

Agreement #

I

Country

Value

Purpose

Beneficiaries

2011

I

Julia Taft Award

I

Congo Republic

25,000

Refugee Aid

2,000

TOTAL

25,000

 

2,000

ADDITIONAL U.S.GOVERNMENT SUPPORT

 

image

 

Year

 

Country

 

Donor

Amount

US$

Project

Description

 

Beneficiaries

2003

Congo Republic

Dept. of Defense

55,010

Community Works Pro.iect

11,000

2007

Congo Republic

NAFAC Europe &

S.W.Asia (U.S Navy)

100,000

Construction of

schools in Pointe Noire area.

5,000

 

TOTAL

155,010

 

16,000

 

 

Funding Agreements with United Nations Agencies

 

CONGO REPUBLIC

Year

UN Agency

Amount

US$

Project Description

IPHDInput

Beneficiaries

 

2010

 

WFP

 

93,000

Food for DRC Refugees along the Congo River

 

100,000

 

16,000

 

2010/11

 

WFP

 

315,000

Food for DRC Refugees

along the Congo River

 

315,000

 

15,000

2011/12

UNHCR

469,759

Reintegration of Refugees from Gabon

469,759

25,000

2012/13

UNHCR

408,576

Reintegration of Refugees

from Gabon

200,000

10,000

2012

 

UNHCR

 

684,166

Water & Sanitation in

Northern Area of the Coiuntry

 

100,000

 

15,000

TOTALS

1,970,501

   1,184,759

81,000

 

 

 

SOME PRIVATE DONOR SUPPORT FOR IPHD'S CONGO REPUBLIC PROGRAM

 

Year

Country

Donor

Amount

US$

Project Description

Beneficiaries

2002

Congo Repu blic

Chevron

100,000

Matching Grant for HIV/AIDS Project.

 

80,000

2006

Congo Republic

Chevron

16,000

Flood Victims Supplies

 1,000

 

 

 

2006

Congo Republic

Challenge Dairy

30,000

16,000 high protein bars (value includes freight)

 1,200

2006

Congo Republic

Medical Missionaries

783,230

Medical Team and Medical Supplies.

Treated

patients/ surveyed needs

 

6,000

2007

Congo Republic

ENI

16,050

School Lunches and School Repairs in Mboukou

800

2007

Congo Repu blic

Chevron

31,000

School Desks

300

2007

Congo Repu blic

U.S.Ambassador

5,000

285 canes for the blind

285

2008

Congo Repu blic

Haliburton

10,000

School Desks

560

2008

Congo Republic

Murphy Oil

5,000

Moukoundo SchooRehab.

4,000

2008

Congo Repu blic

Gifts in Kind

60,000

Toys and books

3,200

2008

Congo Republic

Century Aluminum

7,500

Moukoundo & Moungall School Rehab.

 

600

2008

Congo Republic

Fuller Center

18,000

Housing Project -first stage

500

2010

Congo Repu blic

Chevron

20,000

School Rehab.

550

2010

Congo Repu blic

Robinson Elementary School,, Woodstock, VA

1,750

Books and Toys

800

2010

Congo Republic

ENI

104,545

Construction of Mboukou School

1,000

2011

Congo

ENI

39,757

School Feedin2

3,500

 

2012

Congo Republic

U.S. Potato Board

40,000

Potato seed for IPHD

farms and farmers.

100

2012

Congo Republic

ENI

57,006

School Feeding

3,500

2013

Congo Republic

IPHD

72,927

Purchase of Quality bean, onionm, pea and other seeds including herbicide in the U.S. for IPHD's 7 farms.

30,000

2014

Congo Republic

ENI

300,000

School Feeding, Reoairs, etc.

3,400

2014

Congo

Alaska Salmon Board

 

65,000

Salmon Powder Study (acceptability)

 

3,900

2015

Comw

ENI

300,000

School Feedin!!

3,200

TOTALS

2,082,765

 

148,395

 

image

Note: This does not include individual fundraising donations, individuals, Combined Federal Campaign, other donors like foundations and counterpart agency inputs in undertaking projects. Nor does it include ocean freight costs for medical and some of the other shipments.

 

 

IPHD MEDICAL SHIPMENTS

 

Date

Country

Tonnage Shipped

Value

2007

Congo Republic

15.5

250,000

2008

Congo Republic

15.0

200,000

2009

Congo Republic

0.3

768,000

2011

Congo Republic

14.5

500,000

2012

Congo Republic

16.3

600,000

2016

Congo Republic

6.48

300,000

TOTALS

68.08

2,618,000

 

Note: Values vary depending on what each shipment containsFor examplethe shipment of 0.3 MT valued at $768,000 was a shipment solelcomposed of high value antibiotics.

 

Medical supplies have been donated to IPHD from Medical Missionaries.

 

 


 

Agriculture Component of the School Lunch Program

 

IPHD operates 7 machinery depots with over 115 tractors besides other farm machinery, which for the most part were donated by the UNDP and by the Congolese Government. With the help of foreign agricultural consultants, IPHD was able to repair some of the machinery that was not in use and deteriorating. The machinery is used by IPHD on its 8 farms, as well as being rented out with drivers/operators to farmers living near the depots to increase their production. Machinery rents total over $500,000 annually (in 2014 it was, as an example, $537,000). The machinery rents are not included in the financial description in the earlier sections of this summary. IPHD farms produce corn, manioc, peanuts, green beans, soy beans, rice, onions, and tomatoes. White potatoes were produced during 2013/14.

 

Currently, IPHD is the largest corn producer in the Congo, producing over 1,000 metric tons of corn annually, much of which is ground into cornmeal by IPHD's 3 milling machines. In 2014, the farms produced 2,285 metric tons of food produce, with the Mouindi farm providing 645 metric tons of the total. Rice production was introduced in 2014 and is being expanded and is soon expected to become the largest rice harvest in since the 1997 harvest. Presently, IPHD has over 26,000 hectares in production for all the crops mentioned above.

 

image

 

Tom Onuska from HQ Visiting One of the Tractor Sites

image

 

image

Truclors :it one of lbe CE'.\IA Depots managed by IPHD

 

 

image

Farm tr.u.ron. uwd h IPllD on ool' of ils form..